Shi-Tugohah Joins By covenant; The Anti-Nephi-Lehies

 

Good Day All,

It is with great honor to present this ancient book; contained within The Mentinah Library;

Shi-Tugohah wrote a book. He is the father-in-law of Samuel, The Lamanite…

(The First Book of Shi-Tugohah) recounting the ways and customs of the Ammonites.

The Mentinah Archives Volume One:

The Ways and Customs of the Ammonites

Shi-Tugohah; A Lamanite, fought against Captain Moroni until he was given an opportunity to join the Ammonites by covenant.

Shi-Togohah was also a Captain in the Lamanite army…

He recorded the ways and customs of the Ammonites in marriage, in blessing of children, in coming of age, in baptism, in purification, in healing, in Council of Mothers, in ordination, in Sabbath worship, in celebrations, and in living the Law of Consecration.

Chapter One

1) Behold, I am Shi-Tugohah, the same who went up to war with all my kin against the Nephites when that great captain Moroni led them to victory against us.

I call Moroni great not only because he led the Nephites to victory over us, their enemies, but because he also did show mercy and great wisdom in his treatment of his enemy whom he had beaten.

2) For he did show mercy and provided a means whereby peace could be established once again in the land.

And in this he did show much wisdom because we, the Lamanites, all believed that the Nephites were very full of wickedness, and most especially their leaders.

3) But behold, he did extend unto us even that we might covenant to peace and live among the Nephites.

Now, this was contrary to all that we had been taught.

And this brought the war to an end, and many of us did join with the Nephites.

4) And I went with my people into the land of the Nephites and took up an inheritance among the people who called themselves Ammonites.

And we did begin to till the earth.

And behold, my people did become highly esteemed among them because that many of them were also healers.

5) Behold, the Ammonites are the people in the lands governed by the Nephites who took us in as if we were their own kin.

Verily, all the Lamanites who covenanted not to take up the sword again, when Moroni had offered us our lives, did either return to their homes in peace, or they did travel into the Nephite country and the Ammonites welcomed us.

6) Wherefore, the Ammonites are my people and kin.

Their ways are my ways and their customs have I taken unto myself.

And it has been said that the Ammonites are the most righteous people among the Nephites.

I believe this to be true.

For, among all the armies of the Nephites that ever came against the Lamanites in battle, only the Sons of Helaman fought to victory sustaining many wounds, but behold, none died from them.

Behold, these young men fasted and prayed,

yea, and even sang hymns of thanksgiving while in the heat of battle.

Behold, is this not faith?

7) Wherefore, I find the ceremonies and customs of the Ammonites to be most compelling and do make a record concerning them. ————————————————————————————-

Marriage

8) And this is the manner in which the Ammonites do govern themselves.

Every man abides in the house of one woman and they are married by and through a sacred ordinance that binds them together.

9) And when a man wishes to be joined to a woman, he goes unto her mother and asks her advice as to how he might win the favor of her daughter, his desire.

If the man meets with her approval, she shows him the gifts he must bring and the tokens most likely to make an impression upon her daughter.

Then she arranges many opportunities for the young man and young woman to be together.

10) Then the man goes unto her father and asks his advice how he might win her.

Behold, the father tells him of how he won the love of her mother.

11) When the man has won her love, they go again unto her mother to declare it and to arrange their union.

Her mother calls the father and all his brethren together to discuss and plan the man’s preparation for marriage.

She reminds the old men of the particular necessities of a young woman so that the men are brought to a remembrance of the happy times of their youth.

12) This is wisdom, for a marriage is a happy time for the man and the woman most sure.

But the joy is also extended to everyone in the community, for all are brought into the preparation for the wedding feast and also for the ceremony of the sealing.

13) When the bride’s mother has met in council with the men, and she is satisfied that they are reminded of the bride, the men honor her in a ceremonial way.

If a member of the family is also a Peli, he performs the ceremony.

If no member of the family is a( Order of Levi) -Peli,

a request is made of the Peli Council for one of their number to become a ceremonial uncle to the groom, and he performs the ceremony.

In this way the community cares for one another.

14) And this is the manner in which the ceremony is performed.

The mother of the bride is escorted to the center of the council circle and she sits there.

Then all the men are seated in a circle around her.

In this arrangement, and when all are seated, they sing a song of praise in a sacred manner.

They all clap their hands together three times and sing a joyful, thanksgiving song.

15) When they have finished singing, the Peli fills a bowl with sacred odors and strikes fire to it so that the holy incense rises up and covers the whole council.

16) He prays to the Father, lifting his voice up to the sky and gives thanks for all the blessings of life and the creation.

When he has done this all the council clap their hands three times and they express their agreement.

17) He prays to the Mother, touching the bowl on the head of the mother of the bride, and gives thanks for the blessings of the earth and all the fruits of it.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

18) He prays to the West, lifting the bowl in that direction, and he gives thanks for the good counsel and teachings of the mother of the bride.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

19) He prays to the North, lifting the bowl in that direction, and he gives thanks for the spirit of truth the bride has received from her mother.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and they express their agreement.

20) He prays to the East, lifting up the bowl in that direction, and he gives thanks for the knowledge and the wisdom of the grandfathers that the mother of the bride has used in raising her daughter.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

21) He prays to the South, lifting up the bowl in that direction, and he gives thanks for the good and provident practices that the bride’s mother has taught her.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

22) When this ceremony has been finished, the members of the council each stand and heap praises and gifts upon the bride’s mother, and all the gifts are of such a kind as to be appropriate to be added to the beautiful garment that the bride will wear at the wedding.

23) When all have made an end of speaking and of giving of gifts, the bride’s mother praises the greatness of the gift the council has made for her poor daughter and how happy she will be at the wedding because of the generosity of all her relations.

24) In this way, all of the relations of the bride join together in providing for the bride and her upcoming wedding.

They also join together in prayer and thanksgiving.

This custom teaches the people to take joy in the blessings the Lord abundantly bestows upon them that believe on Him, and to acknowledge His hand in all things.

25) Now, after the whole council has made this ceremony for the mother of the bride,the men of the family take the groom, who is soon to become one of them, and they perform a ceremony together.

In it the men demonstrate that they are willing to esteem the young man as their own relation. This is the manner of the ceremony:

26) The groom is escorted to the center of the council circle and the bride’s brothers form a circle around him.

The bride’s father and his brothers form a circle around them.

The sons of the uncles form a circle around them, and so forth, until all the male relations of the bride encircle the groom.

27) When all the relations are seated around the groom, he also sits and they sing a song of thanksgiving together.

Having sung their thanks, the Peli fills a bowl with sacred odors and strikes fire to it so that the incense rises and fills the room, just as the voices of all had filled the room with joy and prayers of thanks.

28) He raises the bowl and offers it to the Father, giving thanks for the blessings of creation. When he does this, all the council clap their hands and express their agreement.

29) He raises the bowl and offers it to the mother touching the bowl upon the ground in front of the groom, and gives thanks for the blessings of health and of the fruits of labor. He gives thanks for the beauty and strength of the groom. When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

30) The Peli raises the bowl to the West and gives thanks for all the good counsel the groom’s mother has given him.

When he does this, all the council clap their hands and express their agreement.

31) The Peli raises the bowl to the North and gives thanks for the spirit of truth the groom has received from his mother. When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

32) The Peli raises the bowl to the East and gives thanks for the knowledge and wisdom of the grandfathers he has received from his mother. When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

33) The Peli raises the bowl to the South and gives thanks for all the good and provident practices the groom has received from his mother. When he does this, all the council clap their hands three times and express their agreement.

34) When this ceremony has been completed, each of the groom’s new brethren stand up and courteously praise the groom’s mother. They also praise the bride and give advice for the happiness of the new family, and they give gifts to the groom. Now, the gifts they give to the groom are all those kinds of gifts that will ensure the health, prosperity and safety of the new family.

35) When all have made an end of speaking and of giving gifts to the groom, he stands and courteously praises the bride’s mother and all of his new relations for the greatness of the gifts he has received from his new relations.

36) Then the brothers and the father of the bride take the groom and they all perform a purification of the body in the manner of the Ammonites.

And this is the sacred manner in which they do purify the groom and prepare him for the wedding:

37) The brothers of the bride, or some others who stand for her, take the groom and he is stripped of all clothing except for a loin cloth.

Then they gather in fuel for a fire.

It is in this fire that forty-nine stones will be heated.

38) The groom is stripped of everything of his own.

He is washed with clean water and then he is rubbed with oil.

This is to signify that because he has chosen the Lord’s path and the Lord’s way of marriage, he may be washed clean of the blood and sin of this generation.

He is anointed with oil upon the head, the breast, the loin, the belly and upon both knees.

This signifies that he is set apart as a new creation; and that all his parts are anointed unto God.

39) When the groom has been washed and anointed, one of the brothers paints a switch of a stem with red color mixed with oil and with it he ceremonially beats the groom so that the groom’s body is painted with stripes.

This signifies the stripes which Christ shall receive, and by them we shall be healed.

40) Then the groom is clothed in a blanket that was previously provided by the mother of the bride. This is to signify the new position the groom has gained in the family of his bride.

That he brings only his body and his stripes to the family, and yet, he is esteemed as one of them, is a most significant and meaningful performance for the groom.

The blanket also represents outward or worldly needs.

All people have claim upon their family and the community for such things, just as the needy have claim upon him for such wants.

41) When the young men have brought all the fuel, the bride’s father builds the fire with the stones in a sacred manner.

42) During that time when the young men are occupied gathering fuel, the Peli enters the Sweatlodge and seats himself in the west.

He prays earnestly for the groom.

He fills a bowl with sacred odors and raises it to the sacred directions, acknowledging God’s hand in all things.

Having prepared the Lodge in this way, he comes out and directs the rest of the preparation.

43) He purifies all the participants with the incense and leads them in prayer and song. Then they all enter the Lodge and perform the ceremony of purification.

44) Now, the mother of the bride gathers the women kin and they prepare the bride in a similar manner.

They wash her and anoint her, and, taking the gifts given at the council, they work together in preparing the bride’s beautiful garment.

During this time they pray and sing in a sacred manner and the women teach the bride all those things that will help her in her new position in the community.

For, she will soon become a mother among her kin, a position of great responsibility.

45) These ceremonies differ from those of the Nephites;

For the people of Ammon had no temple in the land they were given as their inheritance.

And behold, the distance to the nearest temple was very great.

Wherefore, the prophets of the Nephites did encourage the Ammonites to adopt the message and substance of the temple ordinances and worship into their ceremonial lives.

So did the prophets from Alma’s days down to the present.

And Shiblon, even in the day that I record my observation, does see the wisdom of this practice.

46) But the Ammonites gain greater blessing than do the Nephites, for they are continually in prayer all the day long.

Yea, and all of their celebrations call their attention unto God.

All their comings and all their goings, indeed, all of their doings are dedicated to the Lord and their thanks unto Him are always upon their lips…

Chapter Two

1) The preparations having been complete, whereby the bride and the groom are made ready, the bride’s father brings the Peli to speak to the couple together. And they three are shut up alone for several hours.

During this time the Peli recites to them the history of the creation and teaches them about the Atonement.

2) And the bride and the groom each covenant with God to keep four sacred laws.

They are the Law of the Gospel,

the Law of Sacrifice,

the Law of Chastity

and the Law of Consecration.

They each covenant separately to keep these laws, and then they covenant with each other to do it.

3) The Peli places on them clothing, after the manner of Husbands and Wives, and teaches them the sacred manner of their making. Then they sing a song of thanksgiving together.

And behold, many things are spoken unto them that cannot be written.

4) When the Peli has finished speaking, the bride retires to a separate room and the women kin dress her in the beautiful garment.

Now, this garment is made in the sacred manner, and after the pattern of the garment that the Peli had placed upon the bride and the groom, and it is decorated beautifully.

5) When the bride and all the women rejoin the groom and the Peli, he escorts them all to a place where all their kin are seated, both of the bride and of the groom.

6) Then are they man and wife and all the people clap their hands three times and cry out their agreement in a song of thanksgiving.

It is then the custom for all the people to give gifts to the new couple.

7) When the gifts are all given, tables are set and a great feast is brought out before the assembled multitude.

But before anyone may eat, the father and mother rise and courteously praise the mother of the groom.

Then all are invited to celebrate the marriage and join in the marriage feast.

8) In this sacred manner do all the community celebrate the marriage of a man and a woman, and it is most peculiar indeed, for the great deference given to the mothers of the bride and of the groom.

Yea, all that is good, gentle, kind, industrious, providential, wise, in fine, all things and gifts which do show a good countenance, and character are attributed to the mother.

In this sacred manner do they give praise, honor, and gratitude to the Mother of all Living.
Chapter Three…to be continued…cj

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